10 Things You Need to Know About Local Storage: A Complete Guide

Are you worried about how to store data locally on your computer?

Local storage, a part of web storage API, is a type of persistent storage built into the browser and used to store data on your computer. It may also be used for more complex tasks like gathering analytics when you want to see how many times a particular webpage has been visited while preserving privacy by not storing any personally identifiable information (PII). 

Here are 10 things that every web developer needs to know about local storage:

  1. What it is and why it’s useful
  2. How browsers handle errors
  3. Common use cases
  4. HTTP response caching
  5. Web fonts caching
  6. Browser support
  7. Security
  8. Data format
  9. Persistent vs non-persistent
  10. Local storage availability in modern web browsers.

See: localstorage.setitem.

You can use local storage to store data on your computer.

A common use of this is storing simple pieces of information about an individual visitor, such as their preferences and settings for the site they are visiting or other pages in a website’s web experience. Local storage may also be used for more complex tasks like gathering analytics when you want to see how many times a particular webpage has been visited while preserving privacy by not storing any personally identifiable information (PII).

Data stored using HTML cookies will only work within that origin domain – it cannot be accessed outside of it – but with localStorage, programmers have access to its contents regardless of which domains are involved in the communication between client-side code and server-side logic. This makes it a more flexible and powerful tool that sites can use to tailor the experience for each user.

Web browsers may cache data from websites in order to speed up future visits, reduce network traffic, and generally improve performance.

Most web browsers will also store fonts locally if they’re used on page loads where they would otherwise need to be downloaded with every visit (i.e., font weights below 200).

To make sure your website always looks its best no matter what device someone is using, caches should never be disabled or deleted without careful consideration of which content requires updating less frequently than others – like images vs headlines, buttons vs paragraphs. Many people who are new to programming mistakenly believe that their site’s cached resources are pointless because they’re often replicas of what was stored in a website’s local storage. It is not uncommon for a web developer to run into the issue of browser support because they’ve misunderstood how these two technologies overlap but are still distinctly different, with differing use cases and limitations.